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Four Treatise J.A. Haldane

Four Treatise

J.A. Haldane

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THE Author of this little volume deems no apology necessary for its publication. It consists of four short Treatises on subjects connected with the eternal welfare of every individual of the human race- and the writer considers it to be the duty ofMoreTHE Author of this little volume deems no apology necessary for its publication. It consists of four short Treatises on subjects connected with the eternal welfare of every individual of the human race- and the writer considers it to be the duty of every believer in Christ, to endeavor, by all the means in his power, to call the attention of his fellow­sinners to the glorious gospel of his God and Savior.In the first of the following Treatises the writer has attempted---how feebly he is well aware---to point out some part of the Divine Wisdom, as displayed in the Mystery of Redemption. This is a subject of boundless extent---a subject too immense for the in­tellect of an angel to grasp in all its gran­deur---but at the same time one which ought habitually to occupy our minds. In the Incarnation of the Son of God is displayed the immensity of the misery of man, as occasioned by the fall, by the immensity of the Remedy which was necessary to restore him to happiness. Here then we may medi­tate with profit, and under the influence of the Holy Spirit, learn that wisdom which cometh from above.In the second Treatise is attempted an illustration of one of the most beautiful pieces of Poetry recorded in the sacred volume. The Author considers, that a part of that Psalm, entitled The Prayer of Moses, refers, not as is perhaps most generally supposed, to mans returning to the dust, but to the Resurrection at the last­ day---and he has accordingly endeavored to support this view by a reference as well to other passages of scripture, as to the context. May the remarks which arose out of the consideration of this Psalm, by the blessing of God, prove useful in establishing the believer in his most holy faith, and in showing to some poor sinner the freeness and the efficacy of that gospel which can alone enable us to live with comfort, and support us in that hour when the world, with all its enchantments, is receding from our eyes, and we are about to appear before the Lord of the Universe.The third Treatise on the Doctrine and Duty of Self-examination, was originally published in the year 1806. A new edition has been repeatedly asked for, and the Author hopes that this attempt to enforce a most important duty will not be the less acceptable because it does not appear in a separate form.The last Treatise is on the Faith of the Gospel- it was written many years ago, and is now published without alteration. It was the aim of the writer to remove, so far as he was able, that obscurity in which he considered this subject to have been occa­sionally involved---to show that the mind of the Christian ought not, in the Examination of his Faith, to be so much occupied with the manner as with the substance of his belief---to show that the gospel cannot be really believed merely speculatively, and that those who either trust to their Faith as an act, or to their clear views of the Nature of Faith, instead of fixing their attention on the great Object of Faith, are alike entangled in a grand and most fatal error.Before concluding these remarks, the writer cannot but advert to the different characters of those into whose hands these pages may possibly come. It is a melan­choly consideration, that the largest pro­portion of the people who live in a country where the gospel is preached, are borne along the current of life, forgetful of God, and regardless of eternity.---Such unconcern In a matter that regards their everlasting happiness or misery, is indeed calculated to inspire awe as well as amazement. Whether he engages in the pursuit of wealth, or enters on the race of ambition---whether he devotes himself to the attainment of knowledge, or surrenders himself to the allurements of pleasure---observe the eagerness with which man grasps at earthly happiness.